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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

4 edition of Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo found in the catalog.

Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo

Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo

being a fardle of fancies, or a medley of musick, stewed in four ounces of the oyl of epigrams

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Published by Printed for E.C. for Tho. Alsop ... in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 62:5
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[6], 120 p
Number of Pages120
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15018323M


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Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo: being a fardle of fancies, or a medley of musick, stewed in four ounces of the oyl of epigrams.

[Hugh Crompton]. A poem is usually distinguished by words chosen for their melodious and emotional characteristics, combined into verses which convey passionate messages. Almost every religious scripture contains. Hugh Crompton has written: 'Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo' Asked in Greek and Roman Mythologies, Dionysus (Bacchus) Roman god of.

Crompton, Hugh, fl. Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo being a fardle of fancies, or a medley of musick, stewed in four ounces of the oyl of epigrams.

(London: Printed for E.C. for Tho. Poems by Hugh Crompton, the son of Bacchus, and god-son of Apollo being a fardle of fancies, or a medley of musick, stewed in four ounces of the oyl of epigrams. Crompton, Hugh, fl. / [] Pierides, or, The muses mount by Hugh Crompton, Gent. Full text of "Collectanea anglo-poetica:or, A bibliographical and descriptive catalogue of a portion of a collection of early English poetry, with occasional extracts and remarks biographical and other formats.

Full text of "Collectanea Anglo-poetica: Or, A Bibliographical and Descriptive Catalogue of a Portion of a " See other formats. Full text of "Remains, Historical and Literary, Connected with the Palatine Counties of " See other formats.

Crompton, Hugh, fl. Pierides, or The Muses Mount. By Hugh Crompton London: Printed by J. for Charles Web [etc.] p. Preliminaries and introductory matter omitted.

Crompton, Hugh, fl. Poems By Hugh Crompton, The Son of Bacchus, and God-son of Apollo. Being A fardle of Fancies, or a medley of Musick, stewed in four Ounces.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Caligula (Caius), son of Agrippina in Jonson's Sejanus His Fall. He is abducted by Macro and is last heard of living on Capri and out of favor.

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